Tag Archives: Indigenous

Architectures of (De)Colonization

Follow the Grand River towards Lake Erie and you will find a bend in its waters encircling a significant place. From a nearby street, you can glimpse the building down a long driveway flanked by trees. The approach is leafy, and only upon emerging at its entrance is its grandiosity fully revealed: symmetry, neoclassical features,…

From Instrument to Evidence: Selections from an archive of assimilation

The documentary remnants of these projects, built and unbuilt, locate these building typologies within the colonial agenda: whether carried out on the reserves to displace traditional ways of living on the land, or off the reserves, in the case of residential schools that were intended to indoctrinate children into Euro-Canadian customs. Continue reading in ARPA…

Master of Architecture Thesis: “Don’t Let Fear Take Over”: The Space and Memory of Indian Residential Schools

The Indian Residential School (IRS) system in Canada directly affected 150,000 Indigenous children who were taken to state-sponsored and church-run institutions to separate them from their families and cultures. During the century and a half leading up to around 1970, over 130 IRS were scattered throughout the country. The role of architecture in this genocidal…

Houses, Schools, Hospitals: “Indian” Architecture and the Design of Genocide in Canada

An expansive apparatus of architectural production played a significant role in the Canadian government’s efforts to assimilate Indigenous peoples (originally on Unmaking Things).